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Effects of Scopolamine and Melatonin Cotreatment on Cognition, Neuronal Damage, and Neurogenesis in the Mouse Dentate Gyrus

Authors
  • Chen, Bai Hui
  • Ahn, Ji Hyeon
  • Park, Joon Ha
  • Choi, Soo Young
  • Lee, Yun Lyul
  • Kang, Il Jun
  • Hwang, In Koo
  • Lee, Tae-Kyeong
  • Shin, Bich-Na
  • Lee, Jae-Chul
  • Hong, Seongkweon
  • Jeon, Yong Hwan
  • Shin, Myoung Cheol
  • Cho, Jun Hwi
  • Won, Moo-Ho
  • Lee, Young Joo
Type
Published Article
Journal
Neurochemical Research
Publisher
Springer-Verlag
Publication Date
Dec 19, 2017
Volume
43
Issue
3
Pages
600–608
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1007/s11064-017-2455-x
Source
Springer Nature
Keywords
License
Yellow

Abstract

It has been demonstrated that melatonin plays important roles in memory improvement and promotes neurogenesis in experimental animals. We examined effects of melatonin on cognitive deficits, neuronal damage, cell proliferation, neuroblast differentiation and neuronal maturation in the mouse dentate gyrus after cotreatment of scopolamine (anticholinergic agent) and melatonin. Scopolamine (1 mg/kg) and melatonin (10 mg/kg) were intraperitoneally injected for 2 and/or 4 weeks to 8-week-old mice. Scopolamine treatment induced significant cognitive deficits 2 and 4 weeks after scopolamine treatment, however, cotreatment of scopolamine and melatonin significantly improved spatial learning and short-term memory impairments. Two and 4 weeks after scopolamine treatment, neurons were not damaged/dead in the dentate gyrus, in addition, no neuronal damage/death was shown after cotreatment of scopolamine and melatonin. Ki67 (a marker for cell proliferation)- and doublecortin (a marker for neuroblast differentiation)-positive cells were significantly decreased in the dentate gyrus 2 and 4 weeks after scopolamine treatment, however, cotreatment of scopolamine and melatonin significantly increased Ki67- and doublecortin-positive cells compared with scopolamine-treated group. However, double immunofluorescence for NeuN/BrdU, which indicates newly-generated mature neurons, did not show double-labeled cells (adult neurogenesis) in the dentate gyrus 2 and 4 weeks after cotreatment of scopolamine and melatonin. Our results suggest that melatonin treatment recovers scopolamine-induced spatial learning and short-term memory impairments and restores or increases scopolamine-induced decrease of cell proliferation and neuroblast differentiation, but does not lead to adult neurogenesis (maturation of neurons) in the mouse dentate gyrus following scopolamine treatment.

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