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Effects of prism adaptation and visual scanning training on perceptual and response bias in unilateral spatial neglect.

Authors
  • Gammeri, Roberto1
  • Schintu, Selene2, 3
  • Salatino, Adriana1, 4
  • Vigna, Francesca1
  • Mazza, Alessandro1
  • Gindri, Patrizia5
  • Barba, Sonia1
  • Ricci, Raffaella1
  • 1 Department of Psychology, University of Turin, Torino, Italy. , (Italy)
  • 2 Center for Mind/Brain Sciences-CIMeC, University of Trento, Rovereto, Italy. , (Italy)
  • 3 Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences, The George Washington University, Washington, DC, USA.
  • 4 Institute of Neuroscience (IONS), Université Catholique de Louvain, Bruxelles, Belgium. , (Belgium)
  • 5 Service of Neuropsychological Rehabilitation, Presidio Sanitario San Camillo, Torino, Italy. , (Italy)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Neuropsychological Rehabilitation
Publisher
Informa UK (Taylor & Francis)
Publication Date
Mar 01, 2024
Volume
34
Issue
2
Pages
155–180
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1080/09602011.2022.2158876
PMID: 36652376
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

In some patients with unilateral spatial neglect, symptoms reflect impaired lateralized spatial attention and representation (perceptual bias) whereas in others the inability to respond to stimuli located in contralesional space (response bias). Here, we investigated whether prismatic adaptation (PA) and visual scanning training (VST) differentially affect perceptual and response bias and whether rehabilitation outcome depends on the type of bias underlying symptoms. Two groups of neglect patients in the subacute phase were evaluated before, immediately after, and two weeks following 10 days of PA (n = 9) or VST (n = 9). Standard neuropsychological tests (i.e., Behavioural Inattentional Test, Diller cancellation test, and Line Bisection test) were administered to assess neglect symptoms, while the Landmark task was used to disentangle perceptual and response biases. Performance on the Landmark task revealed that PA was more effective in improving the perceptual bias, while VST mainly modulated the response bias. Neuropsychological tests performance suggested that VST is better suited to modulate neglect in patients with response bias, while PA may be effective in patients with both types of bias. These findings may offer novel insights into the efficacy of PA and VST in the rehabilitation of perceptual and response biases in patients with neglect.

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