Affordable Access

deepdyve-link deepdyve-link
Publisher Website

Effects of previous abdominal surgery incision type on complications and conversion rate in laparoscopic cholecystectomy.

Authors
Type
Published Article
Journal
Surgical laparoscopy, endoscopy & percutaneous techniques
Publication Date
Volume
19
Issue
5
Pages
373–378
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1097/SLE.0b013e3181b92935
PMID: 19851263
Source
Medline
License
Unknown

Abstract

For laparoscopic cholecystectomy, previous abdominal operations are seen as a relative contraindication. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of the incision type of previous abdominal surgery on laparoscopic cholecystectomy in terms of complications and conversion to open surgery. Data from 677 patients who had previously undergone abdominal surgery before undergoing laparoscopic cholecystectomy were prospectively collected and evaluated. From the previous operations, the incisions were upper abdominal in 66 patients, lower abdominal in 567, and upper plus lower in 44. Conversion rates in the upper, lower and upper plus lower groups were 27.27%, 2.82%, and 25%, respectively. Intraoperative major complications were bile duct injury (1 patient, upper plus lower incision group), small bowel mesentery injury, and aortic injury (1 patient each, both in the lower incision group). Postoperative major intra-abdominal complications were duodenal injury (1 patient, upper incision group) and small intestine injury (1 patient, lower incision group). The lower abdominal incision group had fewer adhesions in the upper abdomen than did the other 2 groups, and as a result had a much lower conversion rate.

Statistics

Seen <100 times