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Effects of Plyometric vs. Combined Plyometric Training on Vertical Jump Biomechanics in Female Basketball Players

Authors
  • Sánchez-Sixto, Alberto1
  • Harrison, Andrew J2
  • Floría, Pablo3
  • 1 Sport Department, CEU San Pablo Cardenal Spinola University, Spain , (Spain)
  • 2 Biomechanics Research Unit. University of Limerick, Ireland , (Ireland)
  • 3 Physical Performance & Sports Research Center, Universidad Pablo de Olavide, Spain , (Spain)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Journal of Human Kinetics
Publisher
Sciendo
Publication Date
Jan 30, 2021
Volume
77
Issue
1
Pages
25–35
Identifiers
DOI: 10.2478/hukin-2021-0009
Source
De Gruyter
Keywords
License
Green

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to assess and compare the effects of plyometric training and combined training programs on vertical jump kinematics and kinetics of female basketball players. Thirty-six female basketball players were included in the study and further divided into three groups: plyometric training, n = 11; combined training n =13; and a control group, n =12. Combined training comprised full squat exercise with low resistance (50-65% 1RM) and low volume (3-6 repetitions/set) combined with repeated jumps. Plyometric training included drop jumps and repeated jumps. Both training methods showed a moderate increase in jump performance, although combined training achieved substantially higher values than plyometric training alone. After plyometric training, the vertical velocity and displacement of the center of mass of the countermovement jump increased, while force variables decreased. Combined training increased power, vertical velocity and displacement of the center of mass, but force variables remained unchanged. Both training methods improved jump height, velocity and displacement of the center of mass. Combined training maintained force measures while plyometric training decreased them. These results indicate that combined training might provide better outcomes on jump performance than plyometric training alone. It also appears important to measure biomechanical variables to appropriately interpret the effects of different training methods.

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