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Effects of Photoperiod on the Development of Forensically Important Blow Fly Chrysomya rufifacies (Diptera: Calliphoridae).

Authors
  • Bauer, Amely M1, 2
  • Bauer, Alexandra1, 2
  • Tomberlin, Jeffery K1
  • 1 Department of Entomology, Texas A&M University - 2475 TAMU, College Station, TX.
  • 2 Department of Animal Evolution and Biodiversity, University of Goettingen - Untere Karspuele 2, Goettingen, Germany. , (Germany)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Journal of Medical Entomology
Publisher
Oxford University Press
Publication Date
Sep 07, 2020
Volume
57
Issue
5
Pages
1382–1389
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1093/jme/tjaa058
PMID: 32303768
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

Estimation of the time of colonization (TOC) is often based on laboratory studies that document arthropod development. Precise data for forensically important species, such as blow flies (Diptera: Calliphoridae), are essential for accuracy in the estimate of TOC. Calliphorid development is a quantitative trait and thus depends on a host of variables. In calliphorids, studies showed photoperiod can play a role in development. However, there has been little research to date on the effects of photoperiod, and available data indicate the impact is species-specific. In this study, the effects of photoperiod on the development of Chrysomya rufifacies (Macquart), were examined. Chrysomya rufifacies is a fly of great medical and legal importance and is often encountered on vertebrate remains in temperate and tropic regions throughout the world, including North and Central America, Asia, and Australia. Larvae were reared under light regimes of 12, 16, and 24 h of light at 28.5 ± 0.0°C, 86.2 ± 0.3 RH. Minimum development time for each stage did not differ significantly for the applied photoperiods, nor were there significant differences in total minimum postembryonic development time. Photoperiod did not significantly affect larval size or growth rate. The data suggest that light durations investigated in this study do not influence the development of C. rufifacies. This indicates that photoperiod may not be a concern for forensic entomologists in Texas, United States, or other areas with similar conditions when estimating the TOC for this species. Validation efforts are encouraged to verify this conclusion. © The Author(s) 2020. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: [email protected]

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