Effects of intramuscular polysulfated glycosaminoglycan on chemical and physical defects in equine articular cartilage.

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Effects of intramuscular polysulfated glycosaminoglycan on chemical and physical defects in equine articular cartilage.

Publication Date
Apr 01, 1989
Source
PMC
Keywords
Disciplines
  • Chemistry
License
Unknown

Abstract

The effect of intramuscular polysulfated glycosaminoglycan (PSG) on repair of cartilage injury was evaluated in eight horses. In each horse, one middle carpal joint had both a partial-thickness and a full-thickness articular cartilage defect created. In the contralateral middle carpal joint, chemical articular cartilage injury was created by intra-articular injection of 50 mg sodium monoiodoacetate (MIA). Horses were divided into two groups for treatment. Group 1 horses (control) received an intramuscular injection of normal saline every four days for a total of seven injections starting seven days after cartilage injury. Group 2 horses received 500 mg of PSG intramuscularly every four days for seven treatments starting seven days after cartilage injury. Horses were maintained for 12 weeks. Horses were evaluated clinically, and their middle carpal joints were evaluated radiographically and arthroscopically at the end of the study. Joint tissues were also collected and examined microscopically. The only significant difference between groups was slightly greater matrix staining intensity for glycosaminoglycans in the radiate articular cartilage layer in MIA injected and PSG treated joints. Partial-thickness defects had not healed and the predominant repair tissue in full-thickness defects was fibrous tissue. It was concluded that using this joint injury model, 500 mg PSG administered intramuscularly had no effect on the healing of articular cartilage lesions, and minimal chondroprotective effect from chemically induced articular cartilage degeneration.

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