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Effects of intense pulsed light on Cronobacter sakazakii and Salmonella surrogate Enterococcus faecium inoculated in different powdered foods.

Authors
  • Chen, Dongjie1
  • Cheng, Yanling2
  • Peng, Peng2
  • Liu, Juer1
  • Wang, Yunpu3
  • Ma, Yiwei4
  • Anderson, Erik2
  • Chen, Chi4
  • Chen, Paul2
  • Ruan, Roger5
  • 1 Department of Center for Biorefining and Bioproducts and Biosystems Engineering, University of Minnesota, St. Paul, MN, USA; Department of Food Science and Nutrition, University of Minnesota, St. Paul, MN, USA.
  • 2 Department of Center for Biorefining and Bioproducts and Biosystems Engineering, University of Minnesota, St. Paul, MN, USA.
  • 3 Department of Center for Biorefining and Bioproducts and Biosystems Engineering, University of Minnesota, St. Paul, MN, USA; College of Food Science and Engineering, Nanchang University, Jiangxi, China. , (China)
  • 4 Department of Food Science and Nutrition, University of Minnesota, St. Paul, MN, USA.
  • 5 Department of Center for Biorefining and Bioproducts and Biosystems Engineering, University of Minnesota, St. Paul, MN, USA; Department of Food Science and Nutrition, University of Minnesota, St. Paul, MN, USA. Electronic address: [email protected]
Type
Published Article
Journal
Food chemistry
Publication Date
Oct 30, 2019
Volume
296
Pages
23–28
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1016/j.foodchem.2019.05.180
PMID: 31202302
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

Cronobacter sakazakii and Salmonella spp. are foodborne pathogens associated with low moisture foods. An intense pulsed light (IPL) system is being developed as an alternative novel method to pasteurize powdered food. The aim of the study is to investigate the microorganism inactivation in different powdered foods and a variety of related variables using a vibratory-assisted IPL system. The results showed that C. sakazakii on non-fat dry milk (NFDM), wheat flour, and egg white powder were significantly inactivated by 5.27, 4.92, and 5.30 log10 CFU/g, respectively, after 3 or 4 passes of IPL treatments. For decontamination of E. faecium, 3-4 passes of IPL treatments reduced the E. faecium level on NFDM, wheat flour, and egg white by 3.67, 2.79, 2.74 log10 CFU/g, respectively. These results demonstrated that the enhanced microbiological inactivation can be achieved using this vibratory-assisted IPL system after multiple passes. Copyright © 2019 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

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