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Effects of hypothermia and hyperthermia on the reactivity of rat intracerebral arterioles in vitro.

Authors
Type
Published Article
Journal
Journal of neurosurgery
Publication Date
Volume
75
Issue
3
Pages
433–439
Identifiers
PMID: 1869945
Source
Medline

Abstract

The effects of hypothermia and hyperthermia on the cerebral microcirculation were studied using isolated perfused intracerebral (parenchymal) arterioles obtained from rats. In a temperature-dependent manner, hypothermia (20.0 degrees to 35.0 degrees C) dilated the spontaneous tone developed by the arterioles and also diminished their contractile response to potassium and prostaglandin F2 alpha. In contrast, hyperthermia (40.0 degrees to 45.0 degrees C) induced a biphasic response consisting of initial vasoconstriction and secondary vasodilation. Exposure of the vessels to 45.0 degrees C for 30 minutes irreversibly abolished the spontaneous tone and responsiveness of the arterioles when the temperature of the preparation was returned to 37.5 degrees C. In calcium-free solutions, however, the arteriolar diameter was not affected within a temperature range of 20.0 degrees to 45 degrees C. Furthermore, arterioles that had been in a calcium-free solution during exposure to 45 degrees C temperature recovered their viability at 37.5 degrees C. These results suggest that changes in ambient temperature alter calcium-induced contraction in arteriolar smooth muscle, and that the irreversible effects of hyperthermia on the arterioles are dependent upon extracellular calcium. These studies indicate that alterations in brain temperature may affect the pathogenesis of cerebral ischemia by mechanisms that are in part independent of parenchymal metabolism.

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