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Effects of extrusion, boiling, autoclaving, and microwave heating on lupine allergenicity.

Authors
  • Alvarez-Alvarez, Javier
  • Guillamón, Eva
  • Crespo, Jesús F
  • Cuadrado, Carmen
  • Burbano, Carmen
  • Rodríguez, Julia
  • Fernández, Consuelo
  • Muzquiz, Mercedes
Type
Published Article
Journal
Journal of agricultural and food chemistry
Publication Date
Feb 23, 2005
Volume
53
Issue
4
Pages
1294–1298
Identifiers
PMID: 15713055
Source
Medline
License
Unknown

Abstract

Lupine flour has been reported as a causative agent of allergic reactions. However, the allergenicity of lupine after thermal processing is not well-known. For this purpose, the allergenic characteristics of lupine seeds after boiling (up to 60 min), autoclaving (121 degrees C, 1.18 atm, up to 20 min and 138 degrees C, 2.56 atm, up to 30 min), microwave heating (30 min), and extrusion cooking were studied. The IgE-binding capacity was analyzed by IgE-immunoblotting and CAP inhibition using a serum pool from 23 patients with lupine-specific IgE. Skin testing was carried out in four patients. An important reduction in allergenicity after autoclaving at 138 degrees C for 20 min was observed. IgE antibodies from two individual sera recognized bands at 23 and 29 kDa in autoclaved samples at 138 degrees C for 20 min. Autoclaving for 30 min abolished the IgE binding to these two components. A previously undetected band at 70 kDa was recognized by an individual serum. Therefore, prolonged autoclaving might have an important effect on the allergenicity of lupine with the majority of patients lacking IgE reactivity to these processed samples.

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