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Effects of Environmental Exposures on Fetal and Childhood Growth Trajectories.

Authors
  • Zheng, Tongzhang1
  • Zhang, Jie2
  • Sommer, Kathryn3
  • Bassig, Bryan A4
  • Zhang, Xichi5
  • Braun, Jospeh2
  • Xu, Shuangqing6
  • Boyle, Peter7
  • Zhang, Bin8
  • Shi, Kunchong2
  • Buka, Stephen2
  • Liu, Siming2
  • Li, Yuanyuan9
  • Qian, Zengmin10
  • Dai, Min11
  • Romano, Megan2
  • Zou, Aifen8
  • Kelsey, Karl2
  • 1 Department of Epidemiology, Brown School of Public Health, Providence, RI. Electronic address: [email protected]
  • 2 Department of Epidemiology, Brown School of Public Health, Providence, RI.
  • 3 Haverford College, Haverford, PA.
  • 4 National Cancer Institute, Division of Cancer Epidemiology & Genetics, Occupational and Environmental Epidemiology Branch, Bethesda, MD.
  • 5 George Washington University, Washington, DC.
  • 6 Tongji School of Public Health, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, Hubei, P.R. China. , (China)
  • 7 International Prevention Research Institute, Lyon, France. , (France)
  • 8 Wuhan Medical & Health Center for Women and Children, Wuhan, Hubei, P.R. China. , (China)
  • 9 Department of Epidemiology, Brown School of Public Health, Providence, RI; Tongji School of Public Health, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, Hubei, P.R. China. , (China)
  • 10 College for Public Health & Social Justice, Saint Louis University, St. Louis, MO.
  • 11 China National Cancer Center, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, Beijing, P.R. China. , (China)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Annals of global health
Publication Date
Jan 01, 2016
Volume
82
Issue
1
Pages
41–99
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2016.01.008
PMID: 27325067
Source
Medline
Keywords
License
Unknown

Abstract

Delayed fetal growth and adverse birth outcomes are some of the greatest public health threats to this generation of children worldwide because these conditions are major determinants of mortality, morbidity, and disability in infancy and childhood and are also associated with diseases in adult life. A number of studies have investigated the impacts of a range of environmental conditions during pregnancy (including air pollution, endocrine disruptors, persistent organic pollutants, heavy metals) on fetal and child development. The results, while provocative, have been largely inconsistent. This review summarizes up to date epidemiologic studies linking major environmental pollutants to fetal and child development and suggested future directions for further investigation.

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