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Effects of dietary sugar and of dietary fat on food intake and body fat content in rats.

Authors
  • Oscai, L B
  • Miller, W C
  • Arnall, D A
Type
Published Article
Journal
Growth
Publication Date
Jan 01, 1987
Volume
51
Issue
1
Pages
64–73
Identifiers
PMID: 3623194
Source
Medline
License
Unknown

Abstract

The long term ingestion of a sugar-rich diet (low fat) caused severe obesity in adult rats. In a separate experiment, the habitual consumption of a fat-rich diet (40% kcal from fat) also caused severe obesity. Severe obesity developed in both groups of animals even though they did not overeat. Voluntary food intake for the sugar-fed rats averaged 28,314 +/- 756 calories/rat per 55 wks which was similar to the value of 28,884 +/- 953 calories/rat per 55 wks for the fat-fed rats. However, both values were lower than that of 32,869 +/- 588 for the control rats eating Purina chow. Despite a lower caloric intake, carcass fat averaged 45 +/- 1% for rats eating the sugar-rich diet and 46 +/- 2% for rats eating the fat-rich diet, but only 33 +/- 2% for rats eating a diet of Purina chow. These results provide evidence that severe obesity can develop in the absence of hyperphagia in animals eating a sugar-rich or fat-rich diet. Finally, a rat model for severe obesity is presented in which carcass fat ranged from 18% (lean) to 61% (severe obesity) using dietary intervention alone at critical stages of the animal's life.

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