Affordable Access

Effects of crp mutations on adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate metabolism in Salmonella typhimurium.

Authors
  • Rephaeli, A W
  • Saier, M H Jr
Type
Published Article
Journal
Journal of bacteriology
Publication Date
Jul 01, 1976
Volume
127
Issue
1
Pages
120–127
Identifiers
PMID: 179973
Source
Medline
License
Unknown

Abstract

Wild-type Salmonella typhimurium could not grow with exogenous cyclic adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate (AMP) as the sole source of phosphate, but mutants capable of cyclic AMP utilization could be isolated provided the parental strain contained a functional cyclic AMP phosphodiesterase.All cyclic AMP-utilizing mutants had the growth and fermentation properties of cyclic AMP receptor protein (crp) mutants, and some lacked cyclic AMP binding activity in vitro. The genetic defect in each such mutant was due to a single point mutation, which was co-transducible with cysG. crp mutants isolated by alternative procedures also exhibited the capacity to utilize cyclic AMP. crp mutants synthesized cyclic AMP at increased rates and contained enhanced cellular cyclic AMP levels relative to the parental strains, regardless of whether or not cyclic AMP phosphodiesterase was active. Moreover, adenylate cyclase activity in vivo was less sensitive to regulation by glucose, possibly because the enzyme II complexes of the phosphotransferase system, responsible for glucose transport and phosphorylation, could not be induced to maximal levels. This possibility was strengthened by the observation that enzyme II activity (measured both in vitro by sugar phosphorylation and in vivo by sugar transport and chemotaxis) was inducible in the parental strain but not in crp mutants. The results suggest that the cyclic AMP receptor protein regulates cyclic AMP metabolism as well as catabolic enzyme synthesis.

Report this publication

Statistics

Seen <100 times