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Effects of beta-adrenoreceptor-blocking drugs in patients with Raynaud's phenomenon.

Authors
Type
Published Article
Journal
Circulation
Publication Date
Volume
72
Issue
3
Pages
466–470
Identifiers
PMID: 2861920
Source
Medline

Abstract

Digital vasospastic phenomena have been reported to result from use of nonselective and cardioselective beta-adrenoreceptor-blocking drugs. The effects of 80 mg/day propranolol and 100 mg/day metoprolol on finger hemodynamics and clinical responses were compared with those of placebo in 16 patients with Raynaud's phenomenon. A double-blind, 2 week crossover study design was used with a 2 week washout placebo period between drugs. Total fingertip blood flow (FBF) as determined by venous occlusion plethysmography, fingertip capillary flow (FCF) as determined by radioisotope disappearance rate, and finger systolic blood pressure (FSP) were measured in a 28.3 degrees and a 20 degrees C room at the end of each period. Subjects kept diaries to record vasospastic attacks. There were no significant changes in FBF, FCF, or FSP in the warm or cool environment during drug treatment as compared with during the placebo period. A decrease in pulse rate occurred with both drugs and there was a decrease in blood pressure with metoprolol. There were no significant changes in the number of vasospastic attacks or in the patients' overall evaluation of their conditions while they were receiving the drugs. It is concluded that the presence of Raynaud's phenomenon is not a contraindication to the use of beta-adrenoreceptor-blocking drugs in the normotensive population.

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