Affordable Access

Access to the full text

Effects of air pollution on hospital visits for pneumonia in children: a two-year analysis from China

Authors
  • Li, Die1
  • Wang, Jian-bing1, 2
  • Zhang, Zhen-yu3
  • Shen, Peng4
  • Zheng, Pei-wen1
  • Jin, Ming-juan1
  • Lu, Huai-chu4
  • Lin, Hong-bo4
  • Chen, Kun1, 2
  • 1 Zhejiang University School of Public Health, Department of Epidemiology and Health Statistics, No. 866 Yuhangtang Road, Xihu District, Hangzhou, Zhejiang, 310058, China , Hangzhou (China)
  • 2 Zhejiang University, Research Center for Air Pollution and Health, Hangzhou, Zhejiang, 310058, China , Hangzhou (China)
  • 3 John Hopkins School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD, 21218, USA , Baltimore (United States)
  • 4 Center for Disease Control and Prevention of Yinzhou District, Ningbo, Zhejiang, 315100, China , Ningbo (China)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Environmental Science and Pollution Research
Publisher
Springer-Verlag
Publication Date
Jan 29, 2018
Volume
25
Issue
10
Pages
10049–10057
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1007/s11356-018-1192-2
Source
Springer Nature
Keywords
License
Yellow

Abstract

Although the effect of air pollution on respiratory health has been identified, few studies can be available to evaluate the association of air pollution with hospital visits for children’s pneumonia in China. To explore whether high concentrations of air pollutants (including PM2.5, PM10, NO2, and SO2) are related to hospital visits for pneumonia in children, we conducted a population-based time-series study in Ningbo, China, from January 1st, 2014 to November 1st, 2015. We used a generalized additive Poisson regression model to calculate risk ratios and 95% confidence intervals for the associations of air pollutants and hospital visits for pneumonia in children and found that these four pollutants were associated with the increased hospital visits for pneumonia in children (1.3% for PM2.5, 1.0% for PM10, 2.9% for NO2, 5.0% for SO2 per 10-μg/m3 increase in PM2.5, PM10, NO2, and SO2, respectively). Stronger associations were observed in the cold seasons and among children under 5 years.

Report this publication

Statistics

Seen <100 times