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Effects of 1alpha-hydroxy-vitamin D3 and 1,25-dihydroxy-vitamin D3 on calcium and phosphorus metabolism in hypoparathyroidism.

Authors
  • Neer, R M
  • Holick, M F
  • DeLuca, H F
  • Potts, J T Jr
Type
Published Article
Journal
Metabolism
Publisher
Elsevier
Publication Date
Dec 01, 1975
Volume
24
Issue
12
Pages
1403–1413
Identifiers
PMID: 1196134
Source
Medline
License
Unknown

Abstract

The effects of 1alpha-OH D3 or 1,25-(OH)2D3 on calcium and phosphorus metabolism have been evaluated in five hypoparathyroid patients to establish the direct effects of these compounds in adult humans, uncomplicated by compensatory changes in parathyroid hormone secretion. Doses of 1-2.5 mug/day in four patients (5 mug/day in a fifth patient on diphenylhydantoin and phenobarbital) caused a marked increase in serum calcium concentration and urinary calcium excretion, without significant changes in renal calcium clearance or urinary hydroxyproline excretion. These results suggest that the correction of hypocalcemia involved primarily a stimulation of intestinal calcium absorption rather than a stimulation of skeletal calcium resorption. Simultaneously, there were increases in urinary phosphorus excretion and variable changes in serum inorganic phosphate concentration. These effects were produced by doses of 1alpha-OH D3 and 1,25-(OH)2D3 which approach the dose needed to prevent rickets, in contrast to the very large doses of vitamin D or 25-OH D3 required for comparable effects in hypoparathyroid patients. The increased relative effectiveness of these one-hydroxylated forms of vitamin D reveals a deficiency of vitamin D one-hydroxylation in hypoparathyroidism. The rapidity of action of 1alpha-OH D3 and 1,25-(OH)2D3 was also striking. Apart from its physiologic implications, the potency of the one-hydroxylated forms of vitamin D offers significant therapeutic advantages in some patients whose hypoparathyroidism is difficult to control with vitamin D itself.

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