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The effect of wheelchair propulsion style on changes in time spent in extreme wrist orientations after a bout of fatiguing propulsion.

Authors
  • Zukowski, Lisa A1, 2
  • Hass, Chris J2
  • Shechtman, Orit3
  • Christou, Evangelos A2
  • Tillman, Mark D2, 4
  • 1 a Division of Physical Therapy, Department of Allied Health Sciences , University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill , Chapel Hill , NC , USA.
  • 2 b Department of Applied Physiology and Kinesiology , University of Florida , Gainesville , FL , USA.
  • 3 c Department of Occupational Therapy , University of Florida , Gainesville , FL , USA.
  • 4 d WellStar College of Health and Human Services , Kennesaw State University , Kennesaw , GA , USA.
Type
Published Article
Journal
Ergonomics
Publication Date
Oct 01, 2017
Volume
60
Issue
10
Pages
1425–1434
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1080/00140139.2017.1303084
PMID: 28322620
Source
Medline
Keywords
License
Unknown

Abstract

This study compared how wheelchair propulsion styles affect changes in percentage of time spent in extreme wrist orientations, which have been associated with median nerve injury, after a fatiguing bout of propulsion. Twenty novice, non-disabled adult males learned arcing (ARC) and semicircular (SEMI) propulsion styles and utilised each to perform a wheelchair fatigue protocol. ARC and SEMI did not significantly differ in terms of changes after the fatigue protocol in percentage of time spent in extreme flexion/extension or radial/ulnar deviation at the push phase beginning or end. A pattern was observed, although not significant, of greater increases in percentage of time spent in extreme wrist extension and ulnar deviation during the push phase beginning and ulnar deviation during the push phase end while utilising SEMI relative to ARC. This study evinces that individual differences are greater than observed changes in extreme wrist orientations for both propulsion styles. Practitioner Summary: How wheelchair propulsion styles change with fatigue in terms of extreme wrist orientations was examined. This study evinces that individual differences are greater than observed changes in extreme wrist orientations for both propulsion styles and point towards the need for future research on individual differences utilising propulsion styles.

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