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Effect of weekend admission on geriatric hip fractures

Authors
  • Pasternack, Jordan B
  • Ciminero, Matthew L
  • Silver, Michael
  • Chang, Joseph
  • Simon, Ronald J
  • Kang, Kevin K
Type
Published Article
Journal
World Journal of Orthopedics
Publisher
Baishideng Publishing Group Co (World Journal of Orthopedics)
Publication Date
Sep 18, 2020
Volume
11
Issue
9
Pages
391–399
Identifiers
DOI: 10.5312/wjo.v11.i9.391
PMID: 32999859
PMCID: PMC7507075
Source
PubMed Central
Keywords
License
Green

Abstract

BACKGROUND The care discrepancy for patients presenting to a hospital on the weekend relative to the work week is well documented. With respect to hip fractures, however, there is no consensus about the presence of a so-called “weekend effect”. This study sought to determine the effects, if any, of weekend admission on care of geriatric hip fractures admitted to a large tertiary care hospital. It was hypothesized that geriatric hip fracture patients admitted on a weekend would have longer times to medical optimization and surgery and increased complication and mortality rates relative to those admitted on a weekday. AIM To determine if weekend admission of geriatric hip fractures is associated with poor outcome measures and surgical delay. METHODS A retrospective chart review of operative geriatric hip fractures treated from 2015-2017 at a large tertiary care hospital was conducted. Two cohorts were compared: patients who arrived at the emergency department on a weekend, and those that arrived at the emergency department on a weekday. Primary outcome measures included mortality rate, complication rate, transfusion rate, and length of stay. Secondary outcome measures included time from emergency department arrival to surgery, time from emergency department arrival to medical optimization, and time from medical optimization to surgery. RESULTS There were no statistically significant differences in length of stay ( P = 0.2734), transfusion rate ( P = 0.9325), or mortality rate ( P = 0.3460) between the weekend and weekday cohorts. Complication rate was higher in patients who presented on a weekend compared to patients who presented on a weekday (13.3% vs 8.3%; P = 0.044). Time from emergency department arrival to medical optimization (22.7 h vs 20.0 h; P = 0.0015), time from medical optimization to surgery (13.9 h vs 10.8 h; P = 0.0172), and time from emergency department arrival to surgery (42.7 h vs 32.5 h; P < 0.0001) were all significantly longer in patients who presented to the hospital on a weekend compared to patients who presented to the hospital on a weekday. CONCLUSION This study provided insight into the “weekend effect” for geriatric hip fractures and found that day of presentation has a clinically significant impact on delivered care.

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