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Effect of thrombosis-related gene polymorphisms upon oral cancer: a regression analysis.

Authors
  • Vylliotis, Antonis
  • Yapijakis, Christos
  • Nkenke, Emeka
  • Nisyrios, Themistoklis
  • Avgoustidis, Dimitrios
  • Adamopoulou, Maria
  • Ragos, Vasilios
  • Vassiliou, Stavros
  • Koronellos, Nikolas
  • Vairaktaris, Eleftherios
Type
Published Article
Journal
Anticancer Research
Publisher
International Institute of Anticancer Research
Publication Date
August 2013
Volume
33
Issue
9
Pages
4033–4039
Identifiers
PMID: 24023347
Source
Medline
Keywords
License
Unknown

Abstract

It is well-known that there is an interplay between hemostasis, thrombosis and cancer. Functional DNA polymorphisms in genes encoding factors related to thrombosis have been associated with increased risk for oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). The present study investigated the possible combinatory effect of 10 such polymorphisms as primary risk predictors for OSCC in a European population. Two groups including 160 patients with OSCC and 168 healthy controls of Greek and German origin were studied. The patient and control groups were comparable regarding ethnicity, age and gender. For all studied individuals, 10 genotypes of functional polymorphisms were investigated: 5,10-methylene tetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) C677T, coagulation factor V (F5) Leiden, coagulation factor II (F2, also known as prothrombin) G20210A, coagulation factor XII (F12) C46T, coagulation factor XIII A1 subunit (F13A1) Val34Leu, serpine1 (SERPINE1, also known as plasminogen activator inhibitor-1) 4G/5G, protein Z (PROZ) -A13G, angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE) I/D, angiotensinogen (AGT) Met325Thr, and carboxypeptidase B2 (CPB2, also known as thrombin-activatable fibrinolysis inhibitor) C1040T. Multivariate logistic regression models were used in order to evaluate the relation and contribution of homozygous and heterozygous variant polymorphisms upon overall, early and advanced stages of OSCC. Five out of the studied polymorphisms, influencing the expression of SERPINE1 and ACE genes, as well as the activity of CPB2, F12 and F13 proteins, were recognized as significant predictive factors for OSCC. The 'mode of inheritance' regression model, in particular, revealed the low expression I allele of ACE to be a primary predictor in overall, early and advanced stages of oral cancer. Comparing the present findings with previous knowledge, possible interactions of these factors and their relation to the risk for OSCC development are discussed.

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