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The effect of superficial colorant and glaze on the surface texture of vacuum-fired porcelain.

Authors
  • Cook, P A
  • Griswold, W H
  • Post, A C
Type
Published Article
Journal
Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry
Publisher
Elsevier - Mosby
Publication Date
Apr 01, 1984
Volume
51
Issue
4
Pages
476–484
Identifiers
PMID: 6587069
Source
Medline
License
Unknown

Abstract

The surface smoothness of dental porcelain after the use of various staining and glazing techniques was examined by scanning electron microscopy. The autogenous glazing technique produced a smooth, slightly pitted surface that has been shown to be biologically acceptable and should be used for restorations where the addition of colorant is unnecessary (Fig. 2). If application of glaze powders is desired, the use of the high temperature-induced glazing technique produces a smooth surface (Fig. 4). The use of colorant as the inducing agent does not produce the same degree of smoothness as do the glaze powders (Fig. 3). For teeth that require minimal shade modification, a thin slurry of glaze followed by the colorant modification should be added too unglazed porcelain and air fired to a high temperature-induced glaze (Fig. 6). For teeth that require major color modifications, colorant fixation at 1,500 degrees F followed by a high temperature induced glaze is warranted. The use of the low temperature (1,500 degrees F)-induced glaze should be restricted to cases where high-temperature firing may be detrimental (Fig. 11).

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