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Effect of Serotype and Strain Diversity on Dengue Virus Replication in Australian Mosquito Vectors

Authors
  • Ekwudu, O’mezie1, 2, 3
  • Marquart, Louise4, 5
  • Webb, Lachlan4
  • Lowry, Kym S.1
  • Devine, Gregor J.2
  • Hugo, Leon E.2
  • Frentiu, Francesca D.1
  • 1 (K.S.L.)
  • 2 (L.E.H.)
  • 3 Department of Microbiology, Chukwuemeka Odumegwu Ojukwu University, Uli 431124, Nigeria
  • 4 (L.W.)
  • 5 Clinical Malaria, QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute, Brisbane 4006, Australia
Type
Published Article
Journal
Pathogens
Publisher
MDPI
Publication Date
Aug 18, 2020
Volume
9
Issue
8
Identifiers
DOI: 10.3390/pathogens9080668
PMID: 32824792
PMCID: PMC7460537
Source
PubMed Central
Keywords
License
Green

Abstract

Dengue virus (DENV) is the most important mosquito-borne viral pathogen of humans, comprising four serotypes (DENV-1 to -4) with a myriad of genotypes and strains. The kinetics of DENV replication within the mosquito following ingestion of a blood meal influence the pathogen’s ability to reach the salivary glands and thus the transmission potential. The influence of DENV serotype and strain diversity on virus kinetics in the two main vector species, Aedes aegypti and Ae. albopictus , has been poorly characterized. We tested whether DENV replication kinetics vary systematically among serotypes and strains, using Australian strains of the two vectors. Mosquitoes were blood fed with two strains per serotype, and sampled at 3, 6, 10 and 14-days post-exposure. Virus infection in mosquito bodies, and dissemination of virus to legs and wings, was detected using qRT-PCR. For both vectors, we found significant differences among serotypes in proportions of mosquitoes infected, with higher numbers for DENV-1 and -2 versus other serotypes. Consistent with this, we observed that DENV-1 and -2 generally replicated to higher RNA levels than other serotypes, particularly at earlier time points. There were no significant differences in either speed of infection or dissemination between the mosquito species. Our results suggest that DENV diversity may have important epidemiological consequences by influencing virus kinetics in mosquito vectors.

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