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Effect of Scopolamine on Mice Motor Activity, Lick Behavior and Reversal Learning in the IntelliCage.

Authors
  • Pelsőczi, Péter1
  • Lévay, György2
  • 1 Laboratory of Cognitive Pharmacology, Gedeon Richter Plc., Gyömrői út 19-21, Budapest, 1103, Hungary. , (Hungary)
  • 2 Laboratory of Cognitive Pharmacology, Gedeon Richter Plc., Gyömrői út 19-21, Budapest, 1103, Hungary. [email protected] , (Hungary)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Neurochemical Research
Publisher
Springer-Verlag
Publication Date
Dec 01, 2017
Volume
42
Issue
12
Pages
3597–3602
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1007/s11064-017-2408-4
PMID: 29071534
Source
Medline
Keywords
License
Unknown

Abstract

Automated homecage monitoring systems are now widely recognized and used tools in cognitive neuroscience. However, few of these studies cover pharmacological interventions. Scopolamine, an anticholinergic memory disrupting agent is frequently used to study learning behavior. We studied the impact of scopolamine treatment in a relevant dose-range on activity, drinking behavior and reversal learning of C57BL/DJ mice in a homecage-like, social environment, using the IntelliCage. Naïve mice were first habituated to the IntelliCage, where they learned to nosepoke in any of the four corners in order to gain access to the water reward. Visits, nosepokes, lick numbers and durations were recorded. Mice were then trained to distinguish between a rewarded correct corner and punished, incorrect corners. Later, in the reversal learning phase, the assigned correct corner was rotated clockwise every 24 h. Upon s.c. administration of scopolamine general activity represented by visit and nosepoke numbers increased, but their durations were shorter. Surprisingly, general activity and lick behavior were drastically altered. Scopolamine also significantly reduced the ability to perform a reversal learning task. We not only found significant decline in reversal learning due to scopolamine treatment, but studied the method specific underlying behaviors: the general activity and lick behavior as well.

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