Affordable Access

Effect of rearing floor type and ten-day beak trimming on stress and performance of caged layers.

Authors
  • Struwe, F J1
  • Gleaves, E W
  • Douglas, J H
  • Bond, P L Jr
  • 1 Department of Animal Science, University of Nebraska, Lincoln 68583-0908.
Type
Published Article
Journal
Poultry science
Publication Date
Jan 01, 1992
Volume
71
Issue
1
Pages
70–75
Identifiers
PMID: 1539024
Source
Medline
License
Unknown

Abstract

Beak trimming pullets at an early age is a widespread industry practice. There is some concern that this practice may have effects on the subsequent performance of the birds in the production phase. Effects of beak treatment (trimmed or untrimmed) and rearing floor type (litter or wire) on performance of caged layers were evaluated in a 2 x 2 factorial arrangement of treatments. Pullets that were trimmed or untrimmed at 10 days of age and reared on either litter or wire floors were placed in a cage house. Production factors and stress measurements were recorded to determine detrimental effects of the early trimming and rearing floor types. No interactions (P = .15) between rearing floor type and beak treatment were observed for BW, feed consumption, egg production, heart weight, spleen weight, or blood corticosterone. However, an interaction (P = .02) between rearing floor type and beak treatment was observed for adrenal weight. There were no differences (P = .08) in the final BW of the pullets. Birds reared on litter ate considerably (P = .0002) more than those reared on wire. There were no differences (P = .27) in egg production rate. Adrenal weights were different (P = .007), with the litter-raised birds having much smaller adrenals at the end of the 36-wk trial. Hearts of the beak-trimmed birds were smaller (P = .02) than those of the untrimmed birds. There were no differences in spleen weights (P = .07) or blood corticosterone levels (P = .07). Differences in the feather cover were observed.

Report this publication

Statistics

Seen <100 times