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Effect of pulsed xenon ultraviolet disinfection on methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus contamination of high-touch surfaces in a Japanese hospital.

Authors
  • Kitagawa, Hiroki1
  • Mori, Minako2
  • Kashiyama, Seiya3
  • Sasabe, Yayoi4
  • Ukon, Kiyoko4
  • Shimokawa, Naomi4
  • Shime, Nobuaki5
  • Ohge, Hiroki6
  • 1 Project Research Center for Nosocomial Infectious Diseases, Hiroshima University, Hiroshima, Japan; Department of Surgery, Graduate School of Biomedical and Health Sciences, Hiroshima University, Hiroshima, Japan. Electronic address: [email protected] , (Japan)
  • 2 Department of Infection Control, Hiroshima University Hospital, Hiroshima, Japan; Department of Nursing, Hiroshima University Hospital, Hiroshima, Japan. , (Japan)
  • 3 Project Research Center for Nosocomial Infectious Diseases, Hiroshima University, Hiroshima, Japan; Section of Infection Diseases Laboratory, Department of Clinical Support, Hiroshima University Hospital, Hiroshima, Japan. , (Japan)
  • 4 Department of Nursing, Hiroshima University Hospital, Hiroshima, Japan. , (Japan)
  • 5 Department of Emergency and Critical Care Medicine, Graduate School of Biomedical and Health Sciences, Hiroshima University, Hiroshima, Japan. , (Japan)
  • 6 Project Research Center for Nosocomial Infectious Diseases, Hiroshima University, Hiroshima, Japan; Department of Infectious Diseases, Hiroshima University Hospital, Hiroshima, Japan. , (Japan)
Type
Published Article
Journal
American journal of infection control
Publication Date
Oct 15, 2019
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1016/j.ajic.2019.08.033
PMID: 31627987
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

The hospital environment is an important source of multidrug-resistant organisms such as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). Here, we evaluated the efficacy of pulsed xenon ultraviolet (PX-UV) disinfection in addition to manual cleaning in a Japanese hospital. Environmental samples were collected from inpatient rooms that had been occupied for at least 48 hours by patients infected or colonized with MRSA. High-touch surfaces from 11 rooms were sampled before and after manual cleaning and then after PX-UV disinfection. Changes in bacterial counts and in the number of aerobic bacteria (AB)- and MRSA-positive samples between sampling points were assessed. The time taken to complete PX-UV treatment of patient rooms was also recorded. A total of 306 samples were collected. PX-UV disinfection resulted in a significant decrease in abundance of AB and MRSA (mean colony-forming units 14.4 ± 38.7 to 1.7 ± 6.1, P < .001 and 1.1 ± 3.9 to 0.3 ± 2.0, P < .001, respectively) and in the number of AB- and MRSA-positive samples (58.8%-28.4%, P = .001 and 19.6%-3.9%, P < .001, respectively) compared with manual cleaning. The median time of in-room use of the PX-UV device was 20 minutes. The addition of PX-UV disinfection to the manual cleaning process significantly reduced AB and MRSA contamination of high-touch surfaces in hospital inpatient rooms. Copyright © 2019 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

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