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The effect of music on 10-km cycle time-trial performance.

Authors
  • Hagen, Jana
  • Foster, Carl
  • Rodríguez-Marroyo, Jose
  • de Koning, Jos J
  • Mikat, Richard P
  • Hendrix, Charles R
  • Porcari, John P
Type
Published Article
Journal
International journal of sports physiology and performance
Publication Date
Jan 01, 2013
Volume
8
Issue
1
Pages
104–106
Identifiers
PMID: 22868289
Source
Medline
License
Unknown

Abstract

Music is widely used as an ergogenic aid in sport, but there is little evidence of its effectiveness during closed-loop athletic events. In order to determine the effectiveness of music as an ergogenic aid, well-trained and task-habituated cyclists performed 10-km cycle time trials either while listening to self-selected motivational music or with auditory input blocked. There were no statistically significant differences in performance time or physiological or psychological markers related to music (time-trial duration17.75 ± 2.10 vs 17.81 ± 2.06 min, mean power output 222 ± 66 vs 220 ± 65 W, peak heart rate184 ± 9 vs 183 ± 8 beats/min, peak blood lactate12.1 ± 2.6 vs 11.9 ± 2.1 mmol/L, and final rating of perceived exertion 8.4 ± 1.5 vs 8.5 ± 1.6). It is concluded that during exercise at competitive intensity, there is no meaningful effect of music on either performance or physiology.

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