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Effect of medium-chain TAG and exercise on satiety, energy intake and energy balance.

Authors
  • Maher, Tyler1
  • El-Chab, Alaeddine1
  • Shafat, Amir2
  • Clegg, Miriam E1, 3
  • 1 Oxford Brookes Centre for Nutrition and Health, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Oxford Brookes University, Gipsy Lane, Oxford OX3 0BP, UK.
  • 2 Physiology, School of Medicine, National University of Ireland, GalwayH91 W5P7, Republic of Ireland. , (Ireland)
  • 3 Department of Food and Nutritional Sciences, University of Reading, Whiteknights, Reading RG6 6AP, UK.
Type
Published Article
Journal
British Journal Of Nutrition
Publisher
Cambridge University Press
Publication Date
Dec 14, 2019
Volume
122
Issue
11
Pages
1313–1320
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1017/S0007114519002186
PMID: 31690357
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

The present study examined whether the combination of medium-chain TAG (MCT) along with exercise suppresses energy intake to a greater extent compared with either intervention alone. Twelve participants consumed a porridge breakfast containing 692·9 kJ of either vegetable or MCT oil on two separate occasions: one followed by rest for 240 min and another followed by rest broken up with 1 h of cycling at 65 % $\dot V$O2peak starting at 120 min. At 240 min, participants consumed a buffet lunch to satiation and recorded their food intake for the rest of the day. Expired air samples (for calculation of energy expenditure (EE)) and subjective ratings of appetite on visual analogue scales were taken every 30 min, and gastric emptying (GE) breath samples were taken every 15 min. No effect of either breakfast or exercise condition was observed on energy intake at any time point (P > 0·05) or no effect was observed on subjective appetite ratings (P > 0·05). Exercise trials resulted in significantly higher EE compared with resting trials (2960·6 kJ, 95 % CI 2528·9, 3392·2; P < 0·001), and MCT increased resting EE over 4 h compared with long-chain TAG (LCT) (124·8 kJ, 95 % CI 13·5, 236·0; P = 0·031). GE was accelerated by exercise, regardless of the breakfast consumed, but delayed by MCT in both resting and exercise trials. The results show that exercise causes energy deficits via increased EE without promoting dietary compensation. MCT has no effect on energy intake or satiety but increases EE under resting conditions. There is no additive effect of MCT and exercise on EE, intake or appetite ratings.

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