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Effect of forage type in the ovine diet on the nutritional profile of sheep milk cheese fat.

Authors
  • Renes, E1
  • Gómez-Cortés, P2
  • de la Fuente, M A2
  • Fernández, D1
  • Tornadijo, M E1
  • Fresno, J M3
  • 1 Department of Food Hygiene and Technology, Faculty of Veterinary Science, University of León, 24071, León, Spain. , (Spain)
  • 2 Instituto de Investigación en Ciencias de la Alimentación (CIAL, CSIC-UAM), Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Nicolás Cabrera, 9, 28049, Madrid, Spain. , (Spain)
  • 3 Department of Food Hygiene and Technology, Faculty of Veterinary Science, University of León, 24071, León, Spain. Electronic address: [email protected] , (Spain)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Journal of Dairy Science
Publisher
American Dairy Science Association
Publication Date
Jan 01, 2020
Volume
103
Issue
1
Pages
63–71
Identifiers
DOI: 10.3168/jds.2019-17062
PMID: 31629509
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

The high nutritional value of sheep milk can be advantageous in the manufacture of cheese, and fat plays an important role in sheep cheese properties. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of feeding common hay or silage diets used in commercial farms on the nutritional value of sheep cheese fat. We also monitored the effect of cheese ripening period on the fatty acid profile. Cheeses were produced from milk of sheep fed hay and silage diets from 8 farms, on 4 separate occasions (February, May, August, and November) over a 1-yr period. Eighty-four individual fatty acids were determined and identified by gas chromatography. Ripening time (100 and 180 d) significantly reduced moisture, acidity, and water activity of cheeses but did not affect the fatty acid content. However, hay feeding, compared with silage feeding, led to cheeses with 1.5- and 1.3-fold higher contents of vaccenic acid and conjugated linoleic acid, without detrimental changes in saturated and n-3 (omega-3) fatty acid composition. Hay forages could be a low-cost alternative for producing cheese with a fatty acid profile suitable for human health, which is an aspect of great interest to the food industry. Copyright © 2020 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

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