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Effect of energy and lysine intake in gestation on sow performance.

Authors
  • Cooper, D R
  • Patience, J F
  • Zijlstra, R T
  • Rademacher, M
Type
Published Article
Journal
Journal of animal science
Publication Date
Sep 01, 2001
Volume
79
Issue
9
Pages
2367–2377
Identifiers
PMID: 11583423
Source
Medline
License
Unknown

Abstract

Nutrient intake during gestation has an impact on gestation parameters and subsequent lactation performance. The objectives of this experiment were to determine the impact of feeding two levels of amino acids in gestation on sow BW changes in gestation and lactation, and litter size, and to evaluate a factorial method for determining daily energy requirements. At mating, 419 sows (Camborough 15; Pig Improvement Canada, Acme, AB) were assigned randomly within Parities 1, 2 or 3+ to a gestation diet containing either 0.44% (low lysine) or 0.55% (high lysine) total lysine and 3,100 kcal DE/kg; other indispensable amino acids were adjusted to lysine based on ideal protein ratios. Feed allowance in gestation was determined factorially using estimated DE requirements for maintenance, maternal gain, and conceptus growth. Sows were allowed free access to the lactation diet. Gestation BW gain from d 0 to 110 was affected by parity (61.2, 60.0, and 42.3 kg for Parity 1, 2, and 3+, respectively; P < 0.05) but not (P > 0.10) by gestation lysine level. Sow BW changes from d 0 of lactation to weaning were affected by parity (0.5, 6.8, and 5.8 kg for Parity 1, 2, and 3+, respectively; P < 0.01) and gestation BW gain (P < 0.01), but not by gestation lysine level (5.0 vs 3.8 kg for low and high lysine, respectively; P > 0.10). Total piglets born was affected by parity (11.5, 12.1, and 12.5, for Parity 1, 2, and 3+, respectively; P < 0.01) and increased with increasing sow BW gain (P < 0.05). Total piglets born alive (mean = 11.2) was increased with increasing sow BW gain (P < 0.05). Total litter weight born alive was affected by parity (15.9, 18.6, and 19.4 kg for Parities 1, 2, and 3+, respectively; P < 0.01) and gestation BW gain (P < 0.05). The model used to determine daily energy intake requirements resulted in an average BW gain of 10.6 kg above the targets set by the model. Total lysine intakes greater than 10.6 g/d in gestation did not improve sow productivity. Setting target weight gains in gestation and feeding to meet these targets may not always provide predictable results due to a number of factors that affect the energy requirement in the sow.

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