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Effect of endotracheal suction on lung dynamics in mechanically-ventilated paediatric patients.

Authors
Type
Published Article
Journal
The Australian journal of physiotherapy
Publication Date
Volume
52
Issue
2
Pages
121–126
Identifiers
PMID: 16764549
Source
Medline
License
Unknown

Abstract

Endotracheal suctioning is performed regularly in ventilated infants and children to remove obstructive secretions. The effect of suctioning on respiratory mechanics is not known. This study aimed to determine the immediate effect of endotracheal suctioning on dynamic lung compliance, tidal volume, and airway resistance in mechanically-ventilated paediatric patients by means of a prospective observational clinical study. Lung mechanics were recorded for five minutes before and five minutes after a standardised suctioning procedure in 78 patients intubated with endotracheal tubes < or = 4.0 mm internal diameter. Twenty-four patients with endotracheal tube leaks > or = 20% were excluded from analysis. There was a significant overall decrease in dynamic compliance (p < 0.001) and mechanical expired tidal volume (p = 0.03) following suctioning with no change in the percentage endotracheal tube leak (p = 0.41). The change in dynamic compliance was directly related to both endotracheal tube and catheter sizes. There was no significant change in expiratory or inspiratory airway resistance following suctioning (p > 0.05). Although the majority of patients (68.5%) experienced a drop in dynamic compliance following suctioning, dynamic compliance increased in 31.5% of patients after the procedure. This study demonstrates that endotracheal suctioning frequently causes an immediate drop in dynamic compliance and expired tidal volume in ventilated children with variable lung pathology, intubated with small endotracheal tubes, probably indicating loss of lung volume caused by the suctioning procedure. There is no evidence that suctioning reduces airway resistance.

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