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Effect of elevated carbon dioxide on nutritional quality of tomato.

Authors
  • Wheeler, R M
  • Mackowiak, C L
  • Stutte, G W
  • Yorio, N C
  • Berry, W L
Type
Published Article
Journal
Advances in Space Research
Publisher
Elsevier
Publication Date
Jan 01, 1997
Volume
20
Issue
10
Pages
1975–1978
Identifiers
PMID: 11542578
Source
Medline
Keywords
License
Unknown

Abstract

Tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) cvs. Red Robin (RR) and Reimann Philipp (RP) were grown hydroponically for 105 d with a 12 h photoperiod, 26 degrees C/22 degrees C thermoperiod, and 500 micromol m-2 s-1 PPF at either 400, 1200, 5000, or 10,000 micromol mol-1 (0.04, 0.12, 0.50, 1.00 kPa) CO2. Harvested fruits were analyzed for proximate composition, total dietary fiber, nitrate, and elemental composition. No trends were apparent with regard to CO2 effects on proximate composition, with fruit from all treatments and both cultivars averaging 18.9% protein, 3.6% fat, 10.2% ash, and 67.2% carbohydrate. In comparison, average values for field-grown fruit are 16.6% protein, 3.8% fat, 8.1% ash, and 71.5% carbohydrate (Duke and Atchely, 1986). Total dietary fiber was highest at 10,000 micromol mol-1 (28.4% and 22.6% for RR and RP) and lowest at 1000 micromol mol-1 (18.2% and 15.9% for RR and RP), but showed no overall trend in response to CO2. Nitrate values ranged from 0.19% to 0.35% and showed no trend with regard to CO2. K, Mg, and P concentrations showed no trend in response to CO2, but Ca levels increased from 198 and 956 ppm in RR and RP at 400 micromol mol-1, to 2537 and 2825 ppm at 10,000 micromol mol-1. This increase in Ca caused an increase in fruit Ca/P ratios from 0.07 and 0.37 for RR and RP at 400 micromol mol-1 to 0.99 and 1.23 for RR and RP at 10,000 micromol mol-1, suggesting that more dietary Ca should be available from high CO2-grown fruit.

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