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Diabetes, minor depression and health care utilization and expenditures: a retrospective database study

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BioMed Central
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PMC
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  • Research

Abstract

1478-7547-5-4.fm ral Cost Effectiveness and Resource ss BioMed CentAllocation Open AcceResearch Diabetes, minor depression and health care utilization and expenditures: a retrospective database study Lori Nichols†1, Phoebe L Barton†1, Judith Glazner†1 and Marianne McCollum*2 Address: 1Department of Preventive Medicine and Biometrics, University of Colorado at Denver and Health Sciences Center, Denver, Colorado, USA and 2Department of Clinical Pharmacy, University of Colorado at Denver and Health Sciences Center, 4200 East Ninth Ave., Box C-238, Denver, Colorado, 80262 USA Email: Lori Nichols - [email protected]; Phoebe L Barton - [email protected]; Judith Glazner - [email protected]; Marianne McCollum* - [email protected] * Corresponding author †Equal contributors Abstract Background: To estimate the prevalence of minor depression among US adults with diabetes, health care resource utilization, and expenditures by people with diabetes with and without minor depression. Methods: Among adult 2003 Medical Expenditure Panel Survey respondents, diabetes was identified by diagnosis code and self-report. Depression was identified by diagnosis code plus ≥ one antidepressant prescription. Odds of having depression was estimated in people with diabetes and the general population, adjusted for sociodemographic variables (e.g., age, sex, race/ethnicity). Multivariate regressions evaluated factors associated with utilization and log-transformed expenditures for ambulatory care, hospitalizations, emergency visits, and prescriptions. Results: In 2003, 1932 respondents had diabetes, 435/1932 had diabetes and minor depression. Adults with diabetes were more likely than the general population to have depression (adjusted OR 1.81, 95% CI 1.56, 2.09). People with diabetes with versus without comorbid depression were more likely to be women, have lower incomes and health status, and more diabetes complications (all p < 0.05). In unadjusted analyses, ambula

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