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Educating Parents About Corporal Punishment and Effective Discipline: Pediatricians' Preparedness, Motivation, and Barriers.

Authors
  • Fleckman, Julia M1
  • Scholer, Seth J2
  • Branco, Nelson3
  • Taylor, Catherine A4
  • 1 Tulane University School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine (JM Fleckman and CA Taylor), New Orleans, La. Electronic address: [email protected]
  • 2 Monroe Carell Jr Children's Hospital and Vanderbilt University Medical Center (SJ Scholer), Nashville, Tenn.
  • 3 Tamalpais Pediatrics, University of California (N Branco), San Francisco, Calif.
  • 4 Tulane University School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine (JM Fleckman and CA Taylor), New Orleans, La.
Type
Published Article
Journal
Academic pediatrics
Publication Date
Jan 01, 2021
Volume
21
Issue
1
Pages
149–157
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1016/j.acap.2020.05.028
PMID: 32512053
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

To assess US pediatricians' preparedness, motivation, and barriers related to educating parents about corporal punishment (CP) and effective child discipline. A random sample of 1500 pediatricians was drawn from a nationwide database in the United States. A self-administered questionnaire was sent via mail in 2016. The response rate (53%; n = 787) was maximized via repeated survey mailings and use of cash incentives. The majority of respondents were White (69%), female (59%) and were members of the American Academy of Pediatrics (85%). Most pediatricians felt somewhat prepared to advise parents about child discipline, particularly CP, and perceived their colleagues to be slightly less prepared than themselves. Although most (72%) respondents believed it was "extremely/very" likely that parents valued their advice about child discipline, only 36% believed parents were "extremely/very" likely to follow their advice. Most respondents were highly motivated to participate in activities designed to change norms regarding CP. The most common strategy pediatricians identified for improving child behavior was being consistent with rules (71%). Perceived barriers to providing child discipline advice to parents included lack of time (90%), lack of insurance reimbursement (48%), and lack of training and educational resources (47%). Pediatricians are a key source of professional advice for parents about how to discipline children safely. Given this, along with strong approval and use of CP in the United States and its harm for children, the current findings suggest a strong need for pediatricians to receive additional training on how to advise parents about child discipline along with removal of barriers to providing such advice. Copyright © 2020 Academic Pediatric Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

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