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Economic security, informational resources, and women's reproductive choices in urban Mozambique.

Authors
  • Agadjanian, V1
  • 1 Department of Sociology, Arizona State University, Tempe 85287-2101, USA.
Type
Published Article
Journal
Social biology
Publication Date
Jan 01, 1998
Volume
45
Issue
1-2
Pages
60–79
Identifiers
PMID: 9584578
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

Reproductive changes in sub-Saharan Africa depend upon women's socioeconomic conditions, as well as their informational and cultural resources. Reproductive changes have been most marked in sub-Saharan cities because compared to small-town and rural residents, urban residents have greater exposure to and choice among alternate economic strategies, cultural styles, and social networking. The socioeconomic and cultural determinants and correlates of the intention to stop childbearing and of contraceptive use were assessed among 1585 married, urban women surveyed in 1993 in Greater Maputo. Each woman had recently given birth. Multivariate analysis determined that while the women's intentions to stop childbearing and use contraception were interrelated and affected by factors such as education and the area of residence, the intention to stop childbearing was mainly driven by the women's perception of their material conditions and socioeconomic security, and contraceptive use was mainly a product of social diffusion and influences by innovative, Western-origin information and technologies.

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