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Controversial identification in a historical case is illustrative of the complexity of DNA typing in forensic research. Response to Charlier et al.

Authors
Journal
Forensic Science International Genetics
1872-4973
Publisher
Elsevier
Volume
9
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1016/j.fsigen.2013.10.016
Keywords
  • Genetic Identification
  • Degraded Dna
  • Historical Persons
Disciplines
  • Criminology

Abstract

Abstract The previously published genetic identification of presumptive samples attributed to two French kings, Henri IV and Louis XVI, by Charlier et al., was recently refuted by a genetic genealogic approach. This (provisional) refutation illustrates the difficulties in confirming the identification of historical DNA samples using limited genetic data. Therefore, we want to stress the necessity of including the genetic genealogic approach – which relies on DNA typing of living relatives of the presumptive donor as a confirmed reference – to validate genetic results in historical cases. Moreover, the popularity and broad media coverage of such studies are useful in bringing awareness to the general public, non-DNA forensic experts and lawyers about the complexity of DNA typing in forensic cases.

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