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Early-life hypoxia alters adult physiology and reduces stress resistance and lifespan in Drosophila.

Authors
  • Polan, Danielle M1, 2, 3
  • Alansari, Mohammed1, 2, 3
  • Lee, Byoungchun1, 2, 3
  • Grewal, Savraj S4, 2, 3
  • 1 Clark H. Smith Brain Tumour Centre, Arnie Charbonneau Cancer Institute, University of Calgary, Alberta T2N 4N1, Canada. , (Canada)
  • 2 Alberta Children's Hospital Research Institute, University of Calgary, Alberta T2N 4N1, Canada. , (Canada)
  • 3 Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Calgary, University of Calgary, Alberta T2N 4N1, Canada. , (Canada)
  • 4 Clark H. Smith Brain Tumour Centre, Arnie Charbonneau Cancer Institute, University of Calgary, Alberta T2N 4N1, Canada [email protected] , (Canada)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Journal of Experimental Biology
Publisher
The Company of Biologists
Publication Date
Nov 23, 2020
Volume
223
Issue
Pt 22
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1242/jeb.226027
PMID: 32988998
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

In many animals, short-term fluctuations in environmental conditions in early life often exert long-term effects on adult physiology. In Drosophila, one ecologically relevant environmental variable is hypoxia. Drosophila larvae live on rotting, fermenting food rich in microorganisms, an environment characterized by low ambient oxygen. They have therefore evolved to tolerate hypoxia. Although the acute effects of hypoxia in larvae have been well studied, whether early-life hypoxia affects adult physiology and fitness is less clear. Here, we show that Drosophila exposed to hypoxia during their larval period subsequently show reduced starvation stress resistance and shorter lifespan as adults, with these effects being stronger in males. We find that these effects are associated with reduced whole-body insulin signaling but elevated TOR kinase activity, a manipulation known to reduce lifespan. We also identify a sexually dimorphic effect of larval hypoxia on adult nutrient storage and mobilization. Thus, we find that males, but not females, show elevated levels of lipids and glycogen. Moreover, we see that both males and females exposed to hypoxia as larvae show defective lipid mobilization upon starvation stress as adults. These data demonstrate how early-life hypoxia can exert persistent, sexually dimorphic, long-term effects on Drosophila adult physiology and lifespan. © 2020. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

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