Affordable Access

Publisher Website

Individual, science, and society: ACRM’s mission and the body politic11 No party having a direct financial interest in the results of the research supporting this article has or will confer a benefit upon the author(s) or upon any organization with which the author(s) is/are associated.

Authors
Journal
Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation
0003-9993
Publisher
Elsevier
Publication Date
Volume
85
Issue
4
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1016/j.apmr.2004.01.001
Keywords
  • Acrm Presidential Address

Abstract

Abstract Wilkerson DL. Individual, science, and society: ACRM’s mission and the body politic. Arch Phys Med Rehabil 2004;85:527–530. The core mission of the American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine (ACRM)—using interdisciplinary research to “enhance the lives of persons living with disabilities”—has a role to play in the world. This mission draws on rehabilitation’s origins in a strong belief system about the value of all individuals, regardless of the state of the body structure and function. This address draws on Scheper-Hughes and Lock’s use of the body as a metaphor for a way in which society can think about its beliefs of the human body and disability; a body of science contributing to the evolution of rehabilitation; organizational bodies, both rehabilitation service organizations and ACRM as an organization; and the body politic, a concept used to talk about our engagement in society and its rules, policies, and priorities including research funding. In addition to highlighting excellent interdisciplinary clinical research, ACRM should continue development of a taxonomy of the rehabilitation process; it should endorse the World Health Organization’s International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health as a conceptual framework for research development; it should continue increasing attention on research on participation and the environment; and it should embrace the scientific community of people engaged in evidence-based policy and health services research.

There are no comments yet on this publication. Be the first to share your thoughts.