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Trust in digital records: An increasingly cloudy legal area

Authors
Journal
Computer Law & Security Review
0267-3649
Publisher
Elsevier
Volume
28
Issue
5
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1016/j.clsr.2012.07.009
Keywords
  • Digital Records
  • Digital Forensics
  • Cloud Computing
  • Law Of Evidence
  • Digital Documentary Evidence
Disciplines
  • Communication
  • Computer Science
  • Criminology
  • Law

Abstract

Abstract Trust has been defined in many ways, but at its core it involves acting without the knowledge needed to act. Trust in records depends on four types of knowledge about the creator or custodian of the records: reputation, past performance, competence, and the assurance of confidence in future performance. For over half a century society has been developing and adopting new computer technologies for business and communications in both the public and private realm. Frameworks for establishing trust have developed as technology has progressed. Today, individuals and organizations are increasingly saving and accessing records in cloud computing infrastructures, where we cannot assess our trust in records solely on the four types of knowledge used in the past. Drawing on research conducted at the University of British Columbia into the nature of digital records and their trustworthiness, this article presents the conceptual archival and digital forensic frameworks of trust in records and data, and explores the common law legal framework within which questions of trust in documentary evidence are being tested. Issues and challenges specific to cloud computing are introduced.

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