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Shoulder strength of females while sitting and standing as a function of hand location and force direction

Authors
Journal
Applied Ergonomics
0003-6870
Publisher
Elsevier
Publication Date
Volume
40
Issue
3
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1016/j.apergo.2008.12.003
Keywords
  • Shoulder
  • Strength Capability
  • Female Workers
Disciplines
  • Design

Abstract

Abstract This study evaluated single-handed isometric push strength capabilities of females working at or above-shoulder level. We examined the influence of force exertion direction (vertical, horizontal and lateral), angle of shoulder flexion from horizontal (0°, 30°, 60° and 90°) and gross body posture (standing and sitting), on maximal volitional shoulder strength. Force exertion direction had the greatest affect on shoulder strength ( p < 0.0001). Strength was greatest in the vertical axis pushing downwards and weakest in the horizontal plane pushing forwards. Angle influenced shoulder strength when considered together with direction ( p < 0.0001). However, these effects were dominated by direction results. Marginal differences in strength existed between sitting and standing ( p > 0.05). These results can be used to design workspaces that consider individual strength limitations and their dependence on force direction, work orientation, and gross body posture.

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