Affordable Access

Strong nonagricultural demand keeps agricultural land values increasing

Authors
Publisher
Food and Resource Economics Department, Florida Cooperative Extension Service, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida
Publication Date
Keywords
  • Agriculture ( Lcsh )
  • Farm Life ( Lcsh )
  • Farming ( Lcsh )
  • University Of Florida. ( Lcsh )
  • Farms -- Valuation ( Lcsh )
Disciplines
  • Agricultural Science
  • Design
  • Education
  • Political Science
  • Religious Science

Abstract

FE625 Strong Nonagricultural Demand Keeps Agricultural Land Values Increasing1 John E. Reynolds2 1. This is EDIS document FE625, a publication of the Food and Resource Economics Department, Florida Cooperative Extension Service, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL. Published January 2006. Please visit the EDIS website at http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu. 2. John Reynolds, Professor Emeritus, Food and Resource Economics Department, Florida Cooperative Extension Service, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, and Appraiser/Economist, Natural REsource Planning Services, 5700 SW 34th Street, Suite 324, Gainesville, FL. The Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (IFAS) is an Equal Opportunity Institution authorized to provide research, educational information and other services only to individuals and institutions that function with non-discrimination with respect to race, creed, color, religion, age, disability, sex, sexual orientation, marital status, national origin, political opinions or affiliations. U.S. Department of Agriculture, Cooperative Extension Service, University of Florida, IFAS, Florida A. & M. University Cooperative Extension Program, and Boards of County Commissioners Cooperating. Larry Arrington, Dean The Florida Land Value Survey, conducted by the Food and Resource Economics Department at the University of Florida, provides estimates of the value of different types of agricultural land for geographic regions of the state. The survey questionnaire was designed to obtain estimates of the market value for different types of land as of May 2005. Survey respondents included rural appraisers, farm lenders, real estate brokers, farm managers, land investors, county extension agents, personnel from the Farm Services Agency and the Natural Resource Conservation Service, county property appraisers, and other persons who develop and maintain information about rural lan

There are no comments yet on this publication. Be the first to share your thoughts.