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Primer on Chemical Vegetation Management in Florida Pine Plantations

Authors
Publisher
University of Florida Cooperative Extension Service, Institute of Food and Agriculture Sciences, EDIS
Publication Date
Keywords
  • Forest Management -- Florida
Disciplines
  • Biology
  • Chemistry
  • Education
  • Political Science
  • Religious Science

Abstract

CIR 1477 Primer on Chemical Vegetation Management in Florida Pine Plantations1 Anna Osiecka, Jarek Nowak, and Alan Long2 1. This document is Circular 1477, one of a series of the School of Forest Resources and Conservation, Florida Cooperative Extension Service, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida. First Published: May 2005. Please visit the EDIS Web site at http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu. 2. Anna Osiecka, biological scientist, North Florida Research and Education Center - Quincy; Jarek Nowak, assistant professor, extension specialist, forestry, North Florida Research and Education Center - Quincy; and Alan Long, associate professor, School of Forest Resources and Conservation, Cooperative Extension Service, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida, Gainesville, 32611. The use of trade names in this publication is solely for the purpose of providing specific information. UF/IFAS does not guarantee or warranty the products named, and references to them in this publication do not signify our approval to the exclusion of other suitable products. The Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (IFAS) is an Equal Opportunity Institution authorized to provide research, educational information and other services only to individuals and institutions that function with non-discrimination with respect to race, creed, color, religion, age, disability, sex, sexual orientation, marital status, national origin, political opinions or affiliations. U.S. Department of Agriculture, Cooperative Extension Service, University of Florida, IFAS, Florida A. & M. University Cooperative Extension Program, and Boards of County Commissioners Cooperating. Larry Arrington, Dean The use of weed-control chemicals for vegetation management in forestry has increased dramatically during the last 25 years. When properly employed, herbicides can be a cost-effective tool increasing forest productivity without negatively impacting site quality. They ar

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