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Improving Proximal Fixation and Seal with the HeliFx Aortic EndoAnchor

Authors
Journal
Seminars in Vascular Surgery
0895-7967
Publisher
Elsevier - WB Saunders
Volume
25
Issue
4
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1053/j.semvascsurg.2012.09.002
Disciplines
  • Design
  • Engineering
  • Medicine

Abstract

Endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) transformed the therapy for aortic aneurysms and introduced an era of widespread use for endovascular procedures in a variety of vascular beds. Although dramatic improvements in acute outcomes drove the early enthusiasm for EVAR, a realization that the long-term integrity of the endoprostheses used for EVAR were sometimes inferior to the results obtained with open surgical reconstruction dampened enthusiasm for their use in low-risk and younger patients who mandated long-term follow-up. While early EVAR failure modes are often related to technical aspects of the implantation, late failures are often related to the implant migrating from its original longitudinal position or losing wall apposition in the face of continued aneurysmal dilatation. Migration, or the failure of longitudinal fixation, results in gradual loss of aortic approximation and the eventual repressurization of the aneurysm sac with its attendant risks of growth and rupture. The inability of stent- and barb-based endovascular fixation to resist aortic dilatation at the site of fixation also represents a late failure mode that can result in aneurysm rupture. A variety of endostaples or endoanchors designed to replicate the function of an interrupted aortic suture have been proposed and tested to varying degrees over the years. The device designed and produced by Aptus EndoSystems, now called the HeliFx Aortic EndoAnchor is the only independent endovascular fixation device that has achieved significant clinical usage and Food and Drug Administration approval. The experience with this device is now more than 5 years and it is approved for use in the broad market across both Europe and the United States. This article will review the engineering and design concepts underlying the HeliFx device as well as the in vitro and in vivo results using this device. Finally, a discussion of the potential for technical, procedural, and endograft innovation based on the availability of endovascular suturing will be reviewed.

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