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Review of "Systems Biology in Practice" by Edda Klipp, Ralf Hertwig, Axel Kowald, Christoph Wierling and Hans Lehrach

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BioMed Central
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PMC
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  • Book Review

Abstract

1742-4682-2-34.fm ral Theoretical Biology and Medical ss BioMed CentModelling Open AcceBook review Review of "Systems Biology in Practice" by Edda Klipp, Ralf Hertwig, Axel Kowald, Christoph Wierling and Hans Lehrach Paul S Agutter* Address: Theoretical and Cell Biology Consultancy, 26 Castle Hill, Glossop, Derbyshire, UK Email: Paul S Agutter* - [email protected] * Corresponding author Book details Klipp E, Herwig R, Kowald A, Wierling C, Lehrach H: Systems Biology in Practice Berlin: Wiley-VCH; 2005. 449 pages, ISBN- 10 3-527-31078-9, ISBN-13 978-3-527-31078-4. Eur 99.00 hardback Systems biology – the study of such functional networks as cellular metabolism, signalling and gene expression – is a rapid growth area, as illustrated by many recent publica- tions in Theoretical Biology and Medical Modelling and other journals. Its emergence has been fostered by the develop- ment of automated, high-throughput techniques such as DNA microarrays, of the ever-increasing storage capacity and calculating speed of computers, of new mathematical tools, and of modern electronic communications. Its impact on biological research is already evident: tradi- tional data (e.g. the results of single-gene studies) are being reinterpreted in a broader cellular context, radically new research strategies are appearing, novel insights into the integration of cell systems are being gained, and the prospects for advances in medicine, biotechnology, ecol- ogy and other areas of applied science and technology seem, to the optimistic, almost limitless. To write a book surveying the concepts, methods and potential applica- tions of this nascent though already wide field was a chal- lenging enterprise, but the authors of Systems Biology in Practice have largely achieved their objective. This is a timely volume that should be welcomed both by practis- ing systems biologists and by newcomers to the field. The book is divided into three parts. Part I (chapters 1–4), imental techniques. Par

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