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The incidence and outcomes associated with the late attainment of qualifications in the United Kingdom

Authors
Publisher
Centre for the Economics of Education, London School of Economics and Political Science
Publication Date
Keywords
  • Hd Industries. Land Use. Labor
  • L Education (General)
Disciplines
  • Economics
  • Education
  • Political Science

Abstract

“Should I stay or should I go now “The incidence and outcomes associated with the late attainment of qualifications in the United Kingdom” Gavan Conlon July 2001 Published by Centre for the Economics of Education London School of Economics and Political Science Houghton Street London WC2A 2AE  Gavan Conlon, submitted March 2001 ISBN Individual copy price: £5 The Centre for the Economics of Education is an independent research centre funded by the Department of Education and Employment. The view expressed in this work are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the views of the Department of Education and Employment. All errors and omissions remain the authors. Executive Summary Successive governments in the United Kingdom have consistently attempted to increase the skills base by encouraging younger members of society to remain in education, increasing access to higher and further education and by removing barriers to learning later in life. Although there are estimates of the incidence of educational participation1 and the economic rewards achieved by those in possession of formally recognised qualifications, either in terms of labour market outcomes or earnings, little is known about the personal or family characteristics associated with those engaged in learning later in life. There is no formal definition of what exactly late learning refers to, insufficient quantitative information2 relating to the incidence of adult learning, the associated costs and benefits or even whether the type of qualification or the method by which the qualification is undertaken is important. This paper makes a provisional attempt to answer some of these questions. The conclusions are not intended to be definitive, but should be seen as a basis for other possible research work. However, some conclusions

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