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Radiofrequency Ablation: Effect of Tumor- and Organ-specific Pharmacologic Modulation of Arterial and Portal Venous Blood Flow on Coagulation Diameter in an N1-S1 Tumor Model

Authors
Journal
Journal of Vascular and Interventional Radiology
1051-0443
Publisher
Elsevier
Volume
23
Issue
6
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1016/j.jvir.2012.02.010
Disciplines
  • Medicine

Abstract

Abstract Purpose To investigate inherent differences in vasculature of tumors versus normal parenchyma and efficacy of radiofrequency (RF) ablation with glucagon, adenosine, and a combination of the two compared with normal saline solution (NS) controls in an N1-S1 tumor model implanted in Sprague–Dawley rat livers. Materials and Methods A total of 17 tumors were established in the left lobes of rats. Tumor perfusion relative to surrounding liver parenchyma was evaluated with contrast-enhanced ultrasound with intermittent-bolus technique before and after administration of glucagon, adenosine, a combination of the two, or NS. Tumors were ablated with a 22-gauge RF probe with 1 cm of exposed tip at 80 °C for 2 min. Tumor size, zone of necrosis, and viable tumor were measured in tumors after 2,3,5-triphenyltetrazolium chloride staining. Results were compared with degree of tumor perfusion. Results The normalized tumor perfusion ratio did not significantly change with administration of NS (1.38% ± 3.93). Vasomodulation resulted in significant decreases in normalized tumor perfusion ratio: 66.22% ± 24.57 (P < .01) with glucagon, 71.45% ± 22.72 (P < .01) with adenosine, and 74.98% ± 16.58 (P < .01) with glucagon plus adenosine. After tumor ablation, there was an increase in size of the ablated area by 100%–165% in the three treatment groups compared with NS controls. Differences among treatment groups were not statistically significant. Conclusions Tumor blood flow may be significantly altered by using systemic injection of appropriate medications. This tumor- and organ-specific approach to tumor vasomodulation may be used to enhance current therapeutic options.

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