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The End of National Shipping Policy? A Historical Perspective on Shipping Policy in a Global Economy

  • Ecology
  • Economics
  • Education
  • Geography
  • Political Science


National shipping policy has a long history and is firmly engraved in the economic and political psyche of many nations. This paper, which is centred on history rather than the future, asks whether globalisation implies the end of national shipping policy. While deregulation of world shipping started long before globalisation became a recognised force in trade and trade policies, globalisation will inevitably reinforce liberal trends in shipping. However, there are still many who argue that shipping is a ‘special case’ and there are continued pressures towards a renewal of national shipping policies in many quarters. As a result, there is a need for continued vigilance and education not only of policy makers but of the broader public. There are some maritime areas that will continue to require government attention, most notably with respect to labour (eg training and certification), safety and environmental issues. At the same time, there are new needs brought about by significant changes in technology and corporate governance. In the years ahead, there will be a need to redefine maritime policy objectives and scope as well as to consider new institutional arrangements to provide for the realities of global logistics.International Journal of Maritime Economics (2001) 3, 333–350. doi: 10.1057/palgrave.ijme.9100024

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