Affordable Access

Company Doctor: Risk, Responsibility, and Corporate Professionalism

Authors
Publisher
[email protected]
Publication Date
Disciplines
  • Economics
  • Political Science

Abstract

Company Doctor: Risk, Responsibility, and Corporate Professionalism ILRReview Volume 57 | Number 3 Article 87 4-1-2004 Company Doctor: Risk, Responsibility, and Corporate Professionalism Elaine Draper Follow this and additional works at: http://digitalcommons.ilr.cornell.edu/ilrreview Company Doctor: Risk, Responsibility, and Corporate Professionalism This book review is available in ILRReview: http://digitalcommons.ilr.cornell.edu/ilrreview/vol57/iss3/87 470 INDUSTRIAL AND LABOR RELATIONS REVIEW Maria Cancian and Deborah Reed examine how changes in family structure have affected progress in reducing poverty. They find that the increasing percentage of single-mother fami- lies and related declines in two-parent house- holds have been the most important impedi- ments to progress, although the increase in female labor force participation has moderated their effects to some extent. Richard Freeman finds evidence that the poverty rate has become less sensitive to changes in economic growth and the unemployment rate. He forecasts that improvements to growth in the future will have less impact than in the past because the poor are now disproportionately composed of the disabled, retirees, and unskilled immigrants, groups largely unaffected by labor market op- portunities; he also predicts that any rise in unemployment will increase poverty because it will reduce employment among those with mini- mal access to government transfers. John Karl Scholz and Kara Levine examine trends in spend- ing on means-tested and social insurance pro- grams and find that total cash transfers have slowly risen over time, as expenditure declines for single mother programs like AFDC-TANF have been outweighed by increases in the Earned Income Tax Credit, but that major growth has occurred in Medicaid, Supplementary Security Income, and Food Stamp spending, which has led to large increases in overall spending. While this upward trend in expenditures would ordi- narily be expected to r

There are no comments yet on this publication. Be the first to share your thoughts.