Affordable Access

Access to the full text

Dysfunction in the Fronto-Parietal Network in Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD): An fMRI Study

Authors
  • Silk, Timothy J.1, 2, 3, 4
  • Vance, Alasdair2
  • Rinehart, Nicole3
  • Bradshaw, John L.3
  • Cunnington, Ross1
  • 1 University of Queensland, School of Psychology and Queensland Brain Institute, Brisbane, Australia , Brisbane (Australia)
  • 2 University of Melbourne, Royal Children’s Hospital, Murdoch Children’s Research Institute, Academic Child Psychiatry Unit, Department of Paediatrics, Parkville, Australia , Parkville (Australia)
  • 3 Monash University, School of Psychology, Psychiatry and Psychological Medicine, Clayton, Australia , Clayton (Australia)
  • 4 University of Queensland, Queensland Brain Institute, Brisbane, 4072, Australia , Brisbane (Australia)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Brain Imaging and Behavior
Publisher
Springer-Verlag
Publication Date
Jan 18, 2008
Volume
2
Issue
2
Pages
123–131
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1007/s11682-008-9021-8
Source
Springer Nature
Keywords
License
Yellow

Abstract

ADHD is associated with spatial working memory deficits, thought to be subserved by dysfunction of neural circuits. In this study we aimed to further examine fronto-parietal dysfunction in ADHD by examining brain activation associated with the Raven’s Progressive Matrices task, a visuo-spatial pattern sequencing task involving relational reasoning and thereby placing high-demand loading on the prefrontal cortex. Functional MRI was conducted on twelve right-handed 8–12 year old boys with ADHD-combined type and 12 right-handed, age and performance IQ-matched, healthy boys as they completed items from the Raven’s Progressive Matrices. Our findings further confirm striatum and parietal lobe dysfunction in ADHD. Furthermore, dysfunction in lateral prefrontal regions was found. In addition to lateral prefrontal, striatum and posterior parietal regions, the temporal lobe was also less active. These findings suggest deficits in a widespread ‘functional network’ in ADHD that may be fundamental for visuo-spatial information processing and relational reasoning.

Report this publication

Statistics

Seen <100 times