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Duckweed for Human Nutrition: No Cytotoxic and No Anti-Proliferative Effects on Human Cell Lines

Authors
  • Sree, K. Sowjanya1
  • Dahse, Hans-Martin2
  • Chandran, Jima N.3
  • Schneider, Bernd3
  • Jahreis, Gerhard4
  • Appenroth, Klaus J.5
  • 1 Central University of Kerala, Department of Environmental Science, Periye, India , Periye (India)
  • 2 Leibniz-Institute for Natural Product Research and Infection Biology, Department of Infection Biology, Jena, Germany , Jena (Germany)
  • 3 Max Planck Institute for Chemical Ecology, Biosynthesis/ NMR, Jena, Germany , Jena (Germany)
  • 4 University of Jena, Institute of Nutritional Sciences, Jena, Germany , Jena (Germany)
  • 5 University of Jena, Department of Plant Physiology, Jena, Germany , Jena (Germany)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Plant Foods for Human Nutrition
Publisher
Springer US
Publication Date
Mar 18, 2019
Volume
74
Issue
2
Pages
223–224
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1007/s11130-019-00725-x
Source
Springer Nature
Keywords
License
Yellow

Abstract

Duckweeds (Lemnaceae) possess good qualitative and quantitative profiles of nutritional components for its use as human food. However, no studies have been conducted on the probable presence or absence of any adverse effects. The extracts from seven duckweed species (Spirodela polyrhiza, Landoltia punctata, Lemna gibba, Lemna minor, Wolffiella hyalina, Wolffia globosa, and Wolffia microscopica) covering all five genera of the plant family were herewith tested for cytotoxic effects on the human cell lines HUVEC, K-562, and HeLa and for anti-proliferative activity on HUVEC and K-562 cell lines. From these assays, it is evident that duckweeds do not possess any detectable anti-proliferative or cytotoxic effects, thus, the high nutritional value is not diminished by such detrimental factors. The present result is a first step to exclude any harmful effects of highly nutritious duckweed for human.

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