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Drug-specific immune responses induced by procainamide, hydralazine and isoniazid in guinea-pigs.

Authors
  • Katsutani, N
  • Shionoya, H
Type
Published Article
Journal
International Journal of Immunopharmacology
Publisher
Elsevier
Publication Date
May 01, 1992
Volume
14
Issue
4
Pages
673–679
Identifiers
PMID: 1521934
Source
Medline
License
Unknown

Abstract

The drug-induced graft vs host reaction (GVHR) hypothesis requires, as its first step, specific T-cell immune responses to the drug-modified self. Procainamide, isoniazid and hydralazine are known to provoke various allergic reactions including GVHR-like adverse effects in man. We now report that drug-specific immune responses can easily be induced by these drugs in guinea-pigs. Twenty-five milligrams of each of these drugs and penicillin G, which is known to make covalent bonds with proteins and to also induce drug-specific immune responses, were mixed with complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA) and subcutaneously (s.c.) injected twice at an interval of 2 weeks into female Hartley guinea-pigs. The antibodies to these drugs were assessed by means of an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Two weeks after the last injection, all animals treated with isoniazid, hydralazine and penicillin G produced high titers of antibodies to these drugs. Antibodies to procainamide were also detected, although their antibody titers were low. The specificity of the antibodies produced were tested by the inhibition of ELISA and concentration-dependent inhibition was observed. Delayed type hypersensitivity (DTH) reactions were also observed in the animals treated with procainamide, isoniazid and hydralazine 2 weeks after the last injection. These results suggest that the allergic reactions observed in clinical use are related to the inducing potential of drug-specific immune responses in an animal system. Therefore, immunization of guinea-pigs with test drugs and CFA may give useful information for predicting the occurrence of allergic reactions in man.

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