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Dried green leaf powders of Jew's mellow (Corchorus), persimmon (Diosphyros kaki) and sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas poir) lower hepatic cholesterol concentration and increase fecal bile acid excretion in rats fed a cholesterol-free diet

Authors
  • Innami, Satoshi1
  • Tabata, Kimiko1
  • Shimizu, Jun1
  • Kusunoki, Kikue2
  • Ishida, Hiroshi3
  • Matsuguma, Miki2
  • Wada, Masahiro1
  • Sugiyama, Noriko3
  • Kondo, Mika4
  • 1 Tokyo University of Agriculture, Department of Nutrition, Setagaya-ku, Tokyo, 156, Japan , Setagaya-ku, Tokyo
  • 2 Nakamura-Gakuen University, Department of Food and Nutrition, Fukuoka City, 814-01, Japan , Fukuoka City
  • 3 College of Tokyo University of Agriculture, Department of Nutrition, Setagaya-ku, Tokyo, 156, Japan , Setagaya-ku, Tokyo
  • 4 Arsoa Osho Co., Ltd., Shibuya-ku, Tokyo, 150, Japan , Shibuya-ku, Tokyo
Type
Published Article
Journal
Plant Foods for Human Nutrition
Publisher
Kluwer Academic Publishers
Publication Date
Mar 01, 1998
Volume
52
Issue
1
Pages
55–66
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1023/A:1008031028484
Source
Springer Nature
Keywords
License
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Abstract

A cholesterol-free diet containing dried powder of Jew's mellow leaves, persimmon leaves or sweet potato leaves respectively at 5% level as dietary fiber was fed to male Sprague-Dawley rats for about one month. The experiment was conducted twice except for sweet potato leaves. In the groups fed the diet mixed with powders of any of the three different dried green leaves, the hepatic cholesterol concentration significantly decreased. Such lowering was not observed in serum cholesterol concentration compared with the control (cellulose) group. A significant increase in fecal weight was observed in all the groups fed the green leaf samples. All the dried green leaves increased fecal excretion of bile acids per gram or per day compared with the control group in both experiments, but only the dried Jew's mellow leaves showed an increased excretion of neutral sterols. These results suggest that lowering of hepatic cholesterol by powdered green leaves is not necessarily due to the same factor, but to the increased fecal excretion of bile acids due to inhibited enterohepatic circulation in animals given these samples.

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