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Drama in the Teenage Brain

Authors
  • Mills, Kathryn L.1, 2
  • Goddings, Anne-Lise1, 3
  • Blakemore, Sarah-Jayne1
  • 1 Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience, University College London, London
  • 2 Child Psychiatry Branch, National Institute of Mental Health, Bethesda, MD
  • 3 Institute of Child Health, University College London, London
Type
Published Article
Journal
Frontiers for Young Minds
Publisher
Frontiers Media SA
Publication Date
Apr 24, 2014
Volume
2
Identifiers
DOI: 10.3389/frym.2014.00016
Source
Frontiers
Disciplines
  • Neuroscience
  • Core Concept
License
Green

Abstract

The lives of teenagers are different from the lives of children. This period of life – adolescence – is a time of both social and biological changes. Social life becomes more complex during adolescence, and the teenage years are the period when we hone our skills for navigating the social world. These abilities are reflected in the changes occurring in the brain. We know that the areas of the brain involved in understanding other people and predicting their actions are undergoing changes during adolescence. As a result, this might be a period when we are more sensitive to signals from the people around us and the events in our social lives.

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